Weekly Flu Activity Nationwide: March 24, 2012

2012 3-24 ALI 570

This map posted by the CDC on March 30, 2012 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending March 24. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Over the past two months, there has been modest geographic spread of flu throughout the United States, but overall flu activity remails quite low throughout the county with few exceptions. Illinois and parts of the Pacific Northwest are the only pockets of moderate to high flu activity this week.

Click here to find the Flu View weekly update maps from CDC. Scroll toward the bottom of that web page, stop at the “Geographic Spread of Influenza” map, then click on the tab for “previous week” to see the weekly maps in reverse consecutive order.

An explanation from CDC for each category follows:

Summary of the Geographic Spread of Influenza — State health departments report the estimated level of influenza activity in their state each week through the State and Territorial Epidemiologists Reports. States report influenza activity as no activity, sporadic, local, regional, or widespread. These levels are defined as follows:

  • No Activity: No laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza and no reported increase in the number of cases of ILI.
  • Sporadic: Small numbers of laboratory-confirmed influenza cases or a single laboratory-confirmed influenza outbreak has been reported, but there is no increase in cases of ILI.
  • Local: Outbreaks of influenza or increases in ILI cases and recent laboratory-confirmed influenza in a single region of the state.
  • Regional:Outbreaks of influenza or increases in ILI and recent laboratory confirmed influenza in at least two but less than half the regions of the state with recent laboratory evidence of influenza in those regions.
  • Widespread:Outbreaks of influenza or increases in ILI cases and recent laboratory-confirmed influenza in at least half the regions of the state with recent laboratory evidence of influenza in the state.

Click here for the actual CDC site with further information.

Scroll down this page to see CDC maps and G-LINE summaries from earlier this season and prior seasons.

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2012 1-28 Map 570

This map posted by the CDC on February 5, 2012 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending January 28. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

After a very slow start to the flu season, activity is starting to pick up, but not by much. There are now 6 states reporting regional activity; the rest of the states show local or sporadic activity. Flu activity will continue to rise through February, but will not peak until March or later.

 

2011 US map 9 March 5 570

This map posted by the CDC on March 11, 2011 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending March 6. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activity is widespread in 39 states in the US this week, down from 44 two weeks ago, and two states (Oregon and Utah) are reporting only local activity.  Flu season is not over, but we have clearly passed the peak in activity. The South East US led the country into flu season this year with an early spike in Flu B in December, and now appears to be the region that is leading us back out.

We are nearing the end of the 2010-2011 flu season. We can expect cases of flu to be reported in fewer and fewer numbers over the next 6 weeks until it reaches background levels in mid- to late Spring.

2011 US map 7 Feb 19 570

This map posted by the CDC on Feb 25, 2011 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending Feb 19. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activity is widespread in 44 states in the US this week, up from 37 last week. This is the highest level of activity in the US up to this point in the 2010-2011 season. After lagging behind the rest of the country in flu activity for most of the season, the West Coast and high plains states now report widespread activity as well. 

Flu season has arrived.  We are likely at or near the maximal level of intensity that we can expect for the season. We are likely to see continued high levels of activity for the next 2-4 weeks, followed by a sharp decline. 

 

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2011us map 6 Feb 12 570

This map posted by the CDC on Feb 18, 2011 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending Feb 12. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activityis widespread in 37 states in the US. The West Coast, high plains states, and scattered states in the Mid-West  remain at regional activity.  This represents only minor change from one week ago. We have not seen the rapid spread of of influenza throughout the nation that we have seen in some very severe flu seasons in the past.

Flu season has arrived, and flu activity is likely to expand over the next 2-6 weeks. We can expect widespread activity in virtually every state in the US in the near future.

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2011 US map 5 Feb 5 570

This map posted by the CDC on Feb 11, 2011 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending Feb 5. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activity has become widespread in the majority of the states in the US. The West Coast, high plains states, and scattered states in the Mid-West and East Coast continue to lag behind the rest of the country in this regard.  The high levels of activity that began in the South East states in December has spread throughout most of the country. Widespread activty was reported from 37 states this week, up from 30 last week. Regional activity is now reported in 9 states.  

Flu season has arrived, and flu activity is likely to expand over the next 2-6 weeks. We can expect widespread activity in virtually every state in the US in the near future.

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2011 usmap3 Jan 22 570l

This map posted by the CDC on January 29, 2011 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending January 22. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activity has advanced considerably in the past week throughout the United States. The early season focus in the South East has expanded to the entire East Coast and the South West. Widespread activty was reported from 25 states this week, up from 17 last week. Regional activity is now reported in 16 states, mostly in the middle sections of the country.  There is less flu reported from the Midwest or from the West Coast.

Flu season has arrived, and flu activity is likely to expand over the next 2-6 weeks. States reporting regional and widespread activity can be expected to increase substantially as the flu season continues to develop.

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This map posted by the CDC on January 21, 2011 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending January 15. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activity remains variable throughout the United States, but the trend is clearly toward an increase in more and more states. The early season focus in the South East has expanded. Widespread activty was reported from 17 states this week, up from 11 last week. Widespread activity is now reported in many states on the East Coast, and in the South East and South West.  There is less flu reported from the Midwest or from the West Coast. It is interesting to note that Georgia, one of the first states to report widepread activity in December, has been downgraded to regional activity.

Flu season has arrived, although activity remains variable around the country. States reporting regional and widespread activity can be expected to increase substantially in the next 2-4 weeks as the flu season continues to develop.

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2011 Jan 8 US map 577

This map posted by the CDC on January 13, 2011 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending January 7. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activity remains variable throughout the United States. The focus of flu activity remains  in the South East and Mid-Atlantic states, although even here it is variable. Seven of the eleven states reporting widespread activity are in these regions. However, Georgia has been downgraded from “widespread” to “regional” after a number of weeks of rising activity. Seventeen widely scattered states are reporting regional activity.   Flu is largely absent from the West Coast so far.

We are seeing the beginning of the flu season. States reporting regional and widespread activity can be expected to increase substantially in the next 2-4 weeks as the flu season continues to develop.

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2010 Dec 31 US Map 570

This map posted by the CDC on January 7, 2011 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending December 31. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activity continues to increase throughout the United States, particularly in the South East and Mid-Atlantic states. Six of the eight states reporting widespread activity are in this region; the other two are  New York and Arizona. Sixteen widely scattered states are reporting regional activity. Eleven states are reporting local activity, and fifteen are still reporting only sporadic activity.  Flu is largely absent from the West Coast so far.

Flu season has arrived, but only for parts of the country. States reporting regional and widespread activity can be expected to increase substantially in the next 2-4 weeks as the flu season continues to develop.

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2010 Dec 18 usmap50 570

This map posted by the CDC on December 23 2010 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending December 18. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

Flu activity is increasing, particularly in the South East, where one state (Mississippi) is now reporting widespread activity. Several other states in the South East are reporting Regional activity. Much of the country is reporting no activity at all.

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2010 Dec 4 US Map 570

This map posted by the CDC on December 10 2010 shows influenza activity throughout the United States as of the week ending December 4. The map is updated weekly, but there is a one week lag between data collection and data availability.

The current map shows very little influenza activity in the US this week. Most of the states are reporting sporadic cases or no activity at all.  There was a minor rise in flu activity in the Southeast beginning in mid-November, with a focus in Georgia. However, flu activity in this region is now falling.

Click here to find the Flu View weekly update maps from CDC. Scroll toward the bottom of that web page, stop at the “Geographic Spread of Influenza” map, then click on the tab for “previous week” to see the weekly maps in reverse consecutive order.

An explanation from CDC for each category follows:

Summary of the Geographic Spread of Influenza — State health departments report the estimated level of influenza activity in their state each week through the State and Territorial Epidemiologists Reports. States report influenza activity as no activity, sporadic, local, regional, or widespread. These levels are defined as follows:

  • No Activity: No laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza and no reported increase in the number of cases of ILI.
  • Sporadic: Small numbers of laboratory-confirmed influenza cases or a single laboratory-confirmed influenza outbreak has been reported, but there is no increase in cases of ILI.
  • Local: Outbreaks of influenza or increases in ILI cases and recent laboratory-confirmed influenza in a single region of the state.
  • Regional:Outbreaks of influenza or increases in ILI and recent laboratory confirmed influenza in at least two but less than half the regions of the state with recent laboratory evidence of influenza in those regions.
  • Widespread:Outbreaks of influenza or increases in ILI cases and recent laboratory-confirmed influenza in at least half the regions of the state with recent laboratory evidence of influenza in the state.

Click here for the actual CDC site with further information.

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cdc situation overview

Each week CDC analyzes information about influenza disease activity in the United States and publishes findings of key flu indicators in graphical form in a report called FluView. See the latest update by clicking here.

For an in-depth discussion about the national flu situation this week, click here.